Keeping up with Minister Chrystia Freeland

April 2, 2018
On Wednesday, April 4, your Winnipeg Chamber hosts one of Canada’s busiest leaders and the person tasked with guiding national interests through NAFTA negotiations – Minister Chrystia Freeland.
With a mandate that includes rapidly developing geopolitical events and relationships, it’s hard to keep up with Ms. Freeland. Check the headlines – her To Do list likely overlaps with several breaking items.

Nevertheless, as we prepare to discuss NAFTA, supporting rules-based international order and increasing gender equity in Canadian leadership (whether the boardroom or the caucus meeting), we’d like to offer some suggested reading.

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Chrystia Freeland Wants To Fix the Twenty-first Century
by Simon Lewsen, The Walrus (February 14, 2018)

Our favourite quote:

“I feel very strongly,” says Freeland, “that one of the most pressing challenges today is the threats that the liberal order faces. That order is something we have taken for granted, especially my generation — the postwar peace and prosperity generation. It’s like that Joni Mitchell song, ‘You don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.’”

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The Negotiator
by Jason McBridge, Toronto Life (November 21, 2017)

Our favourite quote:

“Trade negotiations take a long time,” she said. “These are detailed, finicky things, and in some ways, the modernization takes longer because the relationship is already in place. It’s like playing Jenga — if you remove one block, you have to be careful of all the different consequences.”

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Meet Chrystia Freeland, the woman defining Canada’s foreign role
by Adam Radwanski, The Globe and Mail – paywall (August 12, 2017)

Our favourite quote: 

“I think we as Canadians don’t fully appreciate the extent to which, by virtue of our history and our geography, we’re at the nexus of almost every institution that matters in the world,” she told me, rhyming off a list of memberships many bigger and more powerful countries can’t match – NATO and the G7, the Organization of American States and the Asia-Pacific Economic Co-operation, the Commonwealth and la Francophonie. “We have Atlantic, we have Pacific, we have Arctic. That means we’re inside a lot of conversations that don’t always overlap, and we can bring them together.”